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Four Injured in Evening Crash on High Street

All four injuries were reportedly minor in a car crash on High Street on Wednesday evening.

Four people, all reportedly with minor injuries, were taken by ambulance to the hospital after a car cash during the rush hour on Wednesday evening.

The crash occurred at about 4:45 p.m. on High Street near the Route 128 overpass at exit 23. It involved two cars and a total of five people. One person refused medical attention and four others were taken by Lyons ambulance to Beverly Hospital.

On its Facebook and Twitter pages, Danvers Police Department advised drivers to avoid the area because of the crash. It caused significant backups and congestions along High Street, according to Google Traffic.

The crash was cleared from the road by about 5:30 p.m.

It was the second traffic crash with injuries along a major thoroughfare in Danvers during the evening commute in as many days. Two women were injured when their vehicles struck head-on on Locust Street on Tuesday evening at about the same time.

Sean Ward December 13, 2012 at 01:56 PM
Anonymous state employee or government official no doubt. In complete denial. Probably has never driven these intersections.
Sean Ward December 13, 2012 at 02:26 PM
I believe it is 45. It should easily be 50. You can't build up much speed there with all the lights anyway. People going 10 over are almost never the cause. Most of the accidents at these new intersections are at low speeds, mostly under the speed limits. There is always another factor. Confusion, distraction, intoxication, inexperience, these are what cause accidents not going 10 miles per hour over some ridiculously low posted limit. Speed limits on most roads are artificially low because they were set by insurance lobbies and police organizations to make more money. Most of them in Massachusetts have also not changed since the roads were built. We've seen the invention of airbags, antilock brakes, crunch zones, traction control, adaptive headlights, lane departure warnings, and a dozens more safety enhancements in cars since the 50s but 128 is still 55 mph. There are national studies which Massachusetts likes to ignore proving that it is not speed that is the danger but differences in speed. The limit on most sections of 128 should be 65 because most drivers are already going that speed. It is the handful of drivers still going the too slow limit that present the hazard.
Chris Bleicher December 13, 2012 at 06:30 PM
Timing on the new lights are horrible!!! That and the north bound on ramp at high st needs a st light or at least reflectors...its too dark there, someone is going to get seriously hurt if they don't do something!!!
Sara D'Antonio January 04, 2013 at 01:08 AM
As a resident on Milton Rd. the new intersection for the High St intersection is just awful! I have to cross 4 lanes of traffic to get on the highway in either direction and have to pull out in traffic to make my way off my street, thank you to the courteous drivers that understand and allow us out. I have to say, I will not be surprised when someone on this streets gets t-boned. Any ideas on where to start with changing this intersection? Town meeting, state office?? Be safe!
Sean Ward January 04, 2013 at 01:16 AM
Unfortunately Sara nobody you can actual speak to either can or will do anything about this. It will take a few deaths to get the right people's attention. There was alot of outrage over the summer when these opened but nothing came from it. These intersections were horribly designed and then built to spec. The millions are already in the pockets of all those involved. Those intersections will be there for 50 years.

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